Red Rose

Rosebuds Blog

Gen Z, a new generation of travelers, is hitting the road

April 10, 2017

When it comes to young people, we’ve reached the end of the alphabet. Yes, Generation Z has come along, right when we were just decoding the elusive and late-blooming Millennials. First of all, let’s establish the parameters of Gen Z as those born between 1995 to 2012, meaning they will begin graduating from college this spring. Secondly, let’s establish why – from a business standpoint, if for no other reason – we should care about this cohort: They number 73 million in the United States alone, which is quite a demographic and financial force. Finally, let’s establish their predilections. According to generational analysts, members of Gen Z are independent, focused and fiercely competitive. These sound like people we wouldn’t want to disappoint, which is why we also pay attention to travel analysts who have discovered that, when it comes to hotel amenities, Generation Z wants it all, including … (click on the headline to keep reading)

Uber, Lyft and the brave, new world of mobility for travelers

March 10, 2017

There has been nothing short of a revolution in automobile transportation for travelers of all kinds. The days of taxi cabs dominating the field are over. Consider that Uber has a market value well in excess of $50 billion, and it has a host of competitors, including Lyft, which received a $500 million investment from General Motors, and Fontinalis Partners, the venture capital firm funded by Bill Ford, a descendant of Ford Motor Company founder Henry Ford, pitched in another $50 million or so. It doesn’t end there, app-driven ride-hailing services such as Didi Chuxing in China and Gett, an Israeli-based start-up, are also in the game and battling for your business. The point is this … (click on the headline to continue reading)

‘Ask TSA’ social media program receiving kudos from travelers

February 28, 2017

Say “TSA” to a traveler and there is a story at the ready — and not a good one in most cases. The Transportation Security Administration, like so many federal agencies, have a bad reputation with the people it was created to serve. Fortunately, the TSA is well aware of its shortcomings and has made changes designed to improve its services for the traveling public. Specifically, it has torn a page out of the playbooks of U.S. airlines and other businesses by turning to social media channels Twitter (@AskTSA) and Facebook Messenger to communicate with its constituents who need questions answered and problems solved, according to an extensive article recently published in the Wall Street Journal. What’s more, the TSA says tweets often gave them early word of checkpoint problems around the country. The feedback from travelers thus far has been positive. On Facebook, the most common question posed is … (click the headline to continue reading)

Travel podcasts for home and the road

February 13, 2017

One of the most powerful tools of the social media movement is the podcast. They have become hugely popular because they allow us to be informed or entertained while doing any number of other things in our lives, such as commuting, exercising or eating. What’s more, there are podcasts for just about any subject you can imagine, including traveling. There are dozens of podcasts for the traveler. Indeed, travelers will find podcasts especially useful during their travels, particularly on long flights and airport layovers. Fred Perrotta, co-founder of Tortuga Backpacks and a travel enthusiast and writer, notes that most international flights still don’t have wi-fi, so his prescription for passing time includes listening to podcasts, which can be downloaded onto a smartphone free of charge, then listened to without an internet connection. We turned to Perrotta, Gecko Adventures and the Zero to Travel Podcasts Directory to find some of the podcasts that might interest you. Here is a synopsis … (click on the headline to continue reading)

Why U.S. airports are in such disrepair

January 23, 2017

Infrastructure has been a major topic of discussion among business and political leaders for the past several years — particularly in the United States, where the degradation of infrastructure is trillions of dollars behind maintenance schedule. The American Society of Civil Engineers have given U.S. infrastructure a grade of D+ and estimated the country must spend $3.6 trillion by 2020 to get up to snuff. Travelers are privy to the problem because many U.S. airports are badly outdated (despite handling more passengers than any country in the world). Indeed, not a single U.S. airport is ranked in the top 25 in the world, and the country’s largest airports (including Chicago, Los Angeles and New York) are considered bottom-of-the-barrel when rated for traveler satisfaction. Why does the problem persist? That is a question that has been tackled by the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank. It studied the problem and come to some sobering conclusions … (click on the headline to continue)