Rosebuds Blog

When your belongings check in without checking out

June 01, 2011

It’s one of the dreads of travelers; that sinking feeling one gets when realizing something of value has been left in the hotel room. By then it’s often too late because you’re already on the plane or in another city.

Hotel room leave-behinds made headlines not long ago when a police officer left two guns after checking out. That prompted news reporters to ask other hoteliers what guests had left behind. Some of the more amusing and valuable items were prosthetic legs, dentures in glasses, blow-up sheep, a monk’s outfit and diamond rings.

Rolex: Watch what you leave behind
Rolex: Watch what you leave behind

The Rose Hotel is no exception on this front. Travelers are often in a hurry and that can make them absentminded.

Just how do we handle lost items to reunite them with guests? Here’s some real-life examples of our standard procedure.

One of our housekeepers found a Rolex watch in a room a guest had just departed. The housekeeper noted the room number, date and time. The item was then handed over to our executive housekeeper, who placed it in a safe. The front desk then contacted the guest and discreetly inquired if anything was missing. When the guest identified the missing item, the Rolex was sent via FedEx to him.

In another incident, a housekeeper found a diamond ring in the corridor outside a guest room. The front desk called the guest who had most recently occupied the room and inquired about the ring, which the guest confirmed was missing and reclaimed it.

Another guest left house keys in his room after checking out. Fortunately, one of our staff members caught the guest on his cell phone before boarding a flight to his locked home. He returned to Rose and retrieved his keys. Mishap successfully avoided.

A recent guest speaker at the local Firehouse Theater left her iPad in the room. Housekeeping turned the hot new piece of technology over to hotel management and the iPad and owner quickly reclaimed one another.

The same scenario played out when a male guest left a backpack in the closet containing a laptop computer and books.

In a typical week, three or four guests leave items in their rooms, though most are not as valuable or sentimental as those enumerated above. Generally speaking, they range from cell-phone chargers and toothbrushes to shavers and clothing. All are tagged and locked away.

We do our best to make sure what’s lost is found.

 

Written by Mike Consol

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